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Neanderthals in California? Maybe so, provocative study says

April 27, 2017 4:11 AM
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Neanderthals in California? Maybe so, provocative study says

San Diego Natural History Museum Paleontologist Steve Walsh pointing at rock fragment embedded in caliche concretion.

A view of two mastodon femur balls, one faced up and once faced down. Neural spine of a vertebra exposed (lower right) and a broken rib (lower left).

San Diego Natural History Museum Paleontologist Steve Walsh holding a mastodon molar with sediment matrix adhering to it.

San Diego Natural History Museum Paleontologist Don Swanson pointing at rock fragment near a large horizontal mastodon tusk fragment.

San Diego Natural History Museum Paleontologists C. Paul Majors and Matt Colbert excavating fossils discovered at the Cerutti Mastodon site.

San Diego Natural History Museum Paleontologist Steve Walsh pointing at a rock anvil that is cemented in caliche, a mineral deposit of gravel, sand, and nitrates.

Vertebrate paleontologist Dr. James Meadeand Director of PaleoServices Dr. Tom Deméré observing an exposed rib and femur ball in the upper right corner of excavation unitD-3at the Cerutti Mastodon site.

Brett Agenbroad (top left), Larry Agenbroad (left), James Mead (bottom left), and Dr. Tom Deméré excavating fossils found at the Cerutti Mastodon site.

San Diego Natural History Museum Paleontologist Richard Cerutti observing an excavator expanding the Cerutti Mastodon site.

San Diego Natural History Museum Paleontologists C. Paul Majors and Matt Colbert excavating units L-4 and K-4 at the Cerutti Mastodon site.

Unbroken mastodon ribs and vertebrae, including one vertebra with a large well preserved neural spine found in excavation unit J4.

A bulldozer refilling the Cerutti Mastodon site after excavation and salvage of fossils was completed.

A concentration of fossil bone and rock. The unusual positions of the femur heads, one up and one down, broken in the same manner next to each other is unusual. Mastodon molars are located in the lower right hand corner next to a large rock comprised of andesite which is in contact with a broken vertebra. Upper left is a rib angled upwards resting on a granitic pegmatite rock fragment.

San Diego Natural History Museum Paleontologist Steve Walsh screening microfossils found in sedimentary matrix excavated at the Cerutti mastodon site. This photo shows the close proximity to the neighboring housing development.

Caltrans archaeologists Karen Crafts, Chris White, and Don Laylander excavating fossils found at the Cerutti Mastodon site off State Route 54 in San Diego.

A drawer full of Cerutti Mastodon site stone artifacts in the San Diego Natural History Museum’s Paleontology Collection Room.

A drawer full of Cerutti Mastodon site fossils in the San Diego Natural History Museum’s Paleontology Collection Room.

RetiredSan Diego Natural History MuseumPaleontologistRichard Cerutti (left) and Curator of Paleontology and Director of PaleoServices Dr. Tom Deméré(right) examining a drawer full of Cerutti Mastodon site fossils in the San Diego Natural History Museum’s Paleontology Collection Room.

RetiredSan Diego Natural History Museum PaleontologistRichard Cerutti (left) pointing to locations on one of the original fossil maps drafted back in 1993. Curator of Paleontology and Director of PaleoServices Dr. Tom Deméré(right) looks on while holding a fossil femur bone from the Cerutti Mastodon.

RetiredSan Diego Natural History Museum PaleontologistRichard Cerutti (left) and Curator of Paleontology and Director of PaleoServices Dr. Tom Deméré(right) looking at an original map of the Cerutti Mastodon quarry. Cerutti is holding a spiral fractured fossil bone discovered at the site.

A drawer full of Cerutti Mastodon site stone artifacts in the San Diego Natural History Museum’s Paleontology Collection Room.

Source: myplainview.com

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